Saturday, April 4, 2009

Weekly Geeks - Poetry Month


Full details from by Terri at Weekly Geeks.

April is National Poetry Month.

I am combining two of the suggestions made in Option B: "Be a poet!Write your own poem and share with us! Read a poetry book and review it."

I began writing and publishing haiku and short articles on Japanese culture in 1981.My personal site at AOL was recently deleted (along with everyone's else's) after 7 years. It had my prize winning poetry and articles on understanding and writing haiku in the Japanese tradition. So the best I can do is find a few sites or books that mention me and my work.

"Haiku: Poetry Ancient & Modern is a gorgeously illustrated anthology of over 200 poems from 100 of the best haiku poets in America and around the world, as well as translations of the Japanese masters. The poems range in time from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, and follow the elemental themes of earth, air, fire, water, wood and metal. This exquisite collection of haiku is a joyful read for anyone, whether new to haiku or looking to expand their collection."

This is probably the loveliest book that I've had my own work published in. It contains one of my haiku:

winter solstice
the waterfall frozen
in mid-air

in the French edition:

solstice d'hiver
le cascade s'en gelee
en plein air
Haiku: A Poet's Guide by Lee Gurga is an excellent instructional guide for those who write haiku and wish to refine their craft. The author is editor of Modern Haiku, the longest-running journal of haiku and haiku studies in English . He is also poetry editor for Illinois Times and haiku columnist for Solares Hill newspaper (Key West, Florida). He uses one of my poems as an example of a haiku that works well. It had previously won the Best of Issue in Modern Haiku magazine which came with a $50 prize.

plum blossoms falling
the gardener softly singing
in my father's tongue

I leave you with one more:

mother in the garden
a bee among the bluebells
humming

If there is interest I will feature more of my work on Haiku Fridays which is hosted by Christina.

What are you reading/writing for National Poetry Month?
<><><><><><><>
Recent posts:
Giveaway: The Girl Who Stopped Swimming until April 19
Thursday Tea (new meme) Review of Jacob's Room by Virginia Woolf
Weekly Geeks # 12 Leave review links

10 comments:

  1. Wonderful haiku, Sandra. I love this form and have never really tried writing in it. Your work is beautiful and I am sorry about your AOL site.

    I would love to read more of your work. Have you seen this site?
    http://readwritepoem.org

    ReplyDelete
  2. That must have been heartbreaking to see all those lovely words deleted! I will definitely check in to those Friday posts to read more.

    I have been enjoying Nikki Giovanni's new book, Bicycles, as well as the poetry of Sebastian Barry. Very different, both gorgeous and touching.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Sandra, that's beautiful. I definitely want to read more by you. And it's so wonderful that you've been published. It makes me happy. :D

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thats wonderful! Would like to read more from you. I write poetry on my other blog,
    rooted

    I will check out those books.I posted a review about a haiku, senryu and tanka book:

    Tangled in Wistaria

    ReplyDelete
  5. I don´t think I have come across anyone before who could write ´real´ haiku.
    Amazing how much you are able to convey in three lines.
    As you know, I only blog about crime fiction, but I really enjoy teaching poetry in my classes.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Hi Sandra! Just dropping by to let you know that you've won one of the finishers prizes for the Well-Seasoned Reader Challenge (nut butter toffee or truffles). Drop me an email -- mmfbooks AT gmail.com -- and we'll see about getting those to you.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks for the haiku Sandra. You certainly write it very well

    ReplyDelete
  8. Gorgeous haiku. Did you have another record of the haiku you had up on your AOL site? As Frances siad, it must have been heartbreaking to lose it all.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I hope you get a flashdrive, they're so useful! You can have one on a keyring and it stores so many files and images. You can get a basic one quite cheaply.

    I lost all my stuff a couple of years ago without backing anything up, and had to spend the equivalent of a few hundred dollars to get it back from the crashed drive.

    Also if you have a flashdrive, it's so small you can take it with you, and use it in someone else's computer, or a laptop if you have one.

    I've also lost keys in the past which is why I always keep them in my pocket, and never throw them onto a side table when I get home! ;-)

    library cafe --
    we swap lost key stories
    as my coffee cools


    Presence (U.K. haiku magazine ISSN 1366-5367 2007)

    Tinywords.com http://tinywords.com/haiku/2007/07/27/

    St Ambrose University, Iowa, U.S.A.
    O’Keefe Library at SAU April 2007
    The O’Keefe Brief

    all my best,
    Alan
    With Words Online Haiku Competition
    .

    ReplyDelete
  10. I'm glad I found this. I'm trying to educate myself more about poetry and recently mentioned on my blog haiku poetry done in sign language. I was at the bookstore today and overwhelmed by the choices on poetry books, I wish I had seen this before I went so I could look for the one(s) you are in!

    ReplyDelete

Labels

"25 Books That Caused A Commotion" (1) 4 1/2 stars (5) 4 stars (6) 5 stars (8) American literature (21) Asian American authors (1) Australian literature (3) book awards (10) book giveaways (23) book news (4) booking through thursday (3) Books Read This Week (2) Books TBR in 2009 (1) Burma (1) Cambodia (2) Canada (11) Canadian lit (3) Canadian literature (11) Columbian literature (1) Cover Attraction (3) doctors (1) education (1) elephants (1) England (3) English literature (5) environment (1) epistolary fiction (4) Ex-Cottagers in Love (1) family (3) fiction (2) five stars (2) forewords (1) four and a half stars (1) four stars (1) French literature (3) Friday Finds (6) Giller Prize (2) Giller Prize longlist (1) Giller Prize Winner 2008 (1) guest reviews (10) Hachette (2) haiku (4) Haiku Friday (5) historical fiction (6) humour (1) immigrants (1) Index of Books Reviewed (1) interview (1) Iraq (1) Israel (2) Israeli literature (1) It's Monday What are you reading this week? (2) Italian literature (1) Italy (1) Jerusalem (1) Jewish Book Month (3) Jewish Literature (6) Jewish Literature Challenge (2) Judaism (1) Latin American literature (1) Latin American Reading Challenge (1) library books (1) Library Loot (28) Library Loot July 22 (1) literary fiction (38) literature (20) literature in translation (1) love stories (2) Mailbox Monday (19) male friendship (1) marriage (1) medicine (1) memoir (1) music (1) Musing Mondays (2) My Favourite Reads (1) my work (1) mystery (1) Native Canadians (1) New Crayons (6) New Crayons July 5 (1) New England (1) New York (1) Nigeria (1) Nigerian literature (1) Nobel author (3) Nobel authors (1) Nobel Laureate (1) non-fiction (1) Norway (1) Norwegian literature (1) Nova Scotia (1) Orange Prize (2) ornithology (1) Orthodox Judaism (1) psychological fiction (3) Pulitzer Project (1) rating system (1) Read 'Em Yet? Wednesday (1) Read in 2008 (1) reading challenges (62) reading challenges 2010 (1) reviews (46) Russia (1) Russian literature (1) Salon Sunday (1) Scandinavian mystery (1) short stories (2) Show Me 5 Saturday (2) Spanish literature (2) Sunday Salon (3) The Complete Booker Reading Challenge (1) The Martel-Harper Challenge (1) The Sunday Salon (12) Thursday Tea (4) Toronto (1) translation (2) triplets (1) TSS (2) TSS June in Review (1) TSS March in Review (1) TSS May in Review (1) TSS Week in Review (2) Turkish literature (2) Venice (1) Waiting on Wednesday (8) Waiting on Wednesday July 15 (1) war stories (2) Weekly Geeks (11) What Are You Reading On Mondays? (10) What's On Your Nightstand? (8) winners (14) women writers (2) Wondrous Words (1) Wordless Wednesday (3) writers (1) WW II (2) Wyoming (1)

LinkWithin

Blog Widget by LinkWithin